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Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, a novel about the tribulations of two loving but very unalike sisters, ends on the happy note that “…though sisters, and living almost within sight of each other, they could live without disagreement between themselves, or producing coolness between their husbands.” Austen humorously addresses the reality of sisterhood—that any kind of sisterly accord or unity is not a foregone conclusion. For Devoney Looser, Professor of English and scholar of 18th-century women’s literature, the concept of “sisterhood” (figuratively and literally) in authorship is a complex exchange with positive and negative aspects. In fact, the “messiness” of women’s literary history is crucial to many aspects of her scholarship and teaching.

Published April 03, 2012

Collaborating for Conservation

Collaborating for Conservation

Lori Eggert

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Published December 09, 2011

Design in the Virtual World

Design in the Virtual World

So-Yeon Yoon

Assistant Professor, Department of Architectural Studies

Published March 19, 2008

The Sundry Uses of Fuzzy Logic

The Sundry Uses of Fuzzy Logic

James Keller

Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science

Published May 12, 2006

Countering Media Stereotypes

Countering Media Stereotypes

Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz

Assistant Professor of Communication

Published October 28, 2008

Reconstructing the History of Earthquakes, Mountains, and Volcanoes

Reconstructing the History of Earthquakes, Mountains, and Volcanoes

Mian Liu

Professor of Geological Sciences

Published October 10, 2007